Are we naturally more prone to myopia?

Abstract: there is a view that myopia is a lifestyle related disease. It is an evolution of survival of the fittest adopted by human beings to adapt to modern lifestyle. In order to cope with close work, we must have good close reading ability, which is the result of the eye adapting to the environment., According to the Research Report of the World Health Organization, about 1.4 billion people worldwide suffer from myopia, which is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Among them, the proportion of myopia in China is 47%, With the United States (42%), Japan (46%), Singapore (59%) and Hong Kong and Taiwan (56%) are also the regions with the highest prevalence of myopia in the world. Some studies have said that genetic genes determine that Asians are more prone to myopia. This report also shows that Asia accounts for four of the five high incidence areas of myopia. So, are Asians naturally more prone to myopia? Many institutions have done similar studies on genetic factors: in the Ministry of education A sample survey was conducted among Asian yellow people, some white people in Europe and America and some black people in South Africa. The results showed that under the same eye conditions, yellow people were most vulnerable to “myopia”, while the incidence of myopia among white people was significantly low, and the prevalence of myopia among black people was the lowest. According to the current findings, many scientists believe that this may be due to the sensitivity of the yellow race to heredity, which is the genetic susceptibility. Of course, this conclusion is not absolute. At present, the pathogenesis of myopia is still unclear. Only from the analysis of sampling survey data, it is considered that yellow people should prevent myopia most., Competitive factors, there is a view that Asians have a high rate of myopia, and heredity is not the main reason. Compared with other Intercontinental countries, Asia has a large population density, so the competition is more intense. Therefore, many Asian children carry out systematic reading prematurely when their eyes are still developing. The heavy learning pressure leads to a higher myopia rate among Asians., Light factor,

according to the Research Report of the World Health Organization, about 1.4 billion people worldwide suffer from myopia, which is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Among them, the proportion of myopia in China is 47%, Like the United States (42%), Japan (46%), Singapore (59%) and Hong Kong and Taiwan (56%), it is also the region with the highest prevalence of myopia in the world.

Some studies have said that genetic genes determine that Asians are more prone to myopia. This report also shows that Asia accounts for four of the five high incidence areas of myopia. So, is it true that Asians are naturally more likely to suffer from myopia?

genetic factors

many institutions have done similar research: sampling surveys have been conducted among some Asian yellow people, some white people in Europe and America and some blacks in South Africa. The results show that under the same eye use, yellow people are most vulnerable to “myopia”, while the incidence of myopia among white people is obviously low, and the prevalence of myopia among black people is the lowest. According to the current findings, many scientists believe that this may be due to the sensitivity of the yellow race to heredity, that is, the susceptibility of heredity.

of course, this conclusion is not absolute. At present, the pathogenesis of myopia is still unclear. Only from the analysis of sampling survey data, it is considered that yellow people should prevent myopia most.

competitive factors

there is a view that Asians have a high rate of myopia, and heredity is not the main reason. Compared with other Intercontinental countries, the population density in Asia is large, so the competition is more intense. Therefore, many Asian children carry out systematic reading too early when their eyes are still developing. The heavy learning pressure leads to a higher myopia rate in Asia.

light factor

an article published in nature pointed out that myopia is rapidly becoming a “global epidemic”. Research shows that children who spend less time outdoors are more likely to suffer from myopia. At present, there is a hypothesis that light stimulates the retina to release dopamine, which in turn prevents the elongation of the eyeball during development. This hypothesis has been verified by animal experiments.

it is generally believed that spending too much time reading or doing homework close will cause myopia. However, Ohio State University followed 500 children aged eight or nine. They had normal vision at the beginning of the study, and one in five suffered from myopia five years later. The analysis shows that reading a few hours a week and how much time you spend on the computer have no direct impact, and the time for outdoor activities is more relevant. An Australian follow-up survey of 4000 children in Sydney reached the same conclusion.

in a study in Guangzhou, China, children in six schools began to add 40 minutes of outdoor courses every day from the age of six or seven. After three years, the myopia rate was 30%, while the myopia rate of children in the control group was 40%.

and

due to the differences in economy, culture, education and lifestyle, the outdoor activity time of teenagers in China and even Asia is generally lower than that in European and American countries. Exposure to natural light is also relatively less, which may be one of the reasons why the myopia rate in Asia is higher than that in Europe and America.

myopia may be the result of adapting to modern life?

and

have a view that myopia is a lifestyle related disease and an evolution of survival of the fittest adopted by human beings to adapt to modern lifestyle. In order to cope with close work, we must have good close reading ability, which is the result of the eye adapting to the environment.

Eskimos are a typical example. In the past, they used to use their eyes from a long distance and had no myopia at all. When modern civilization entered the Arctic Circle, Eskimos also appeared myopia.

warm tips

in fact, whether it is more likely to be myopia or not, we should pay attention to the prevention and treatment of myopia and develop good eye habits. Usually we should pay attention to eye hygiene, standardize the posture of reading and learning, give more time for eyes to rest, and often do eye exercises, which can reduce the incidence of myopia. At the same time, more outdoor sports and good living habits are also effective ways to prevent myopia.